Tag: hearing aid maintenance

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6 Ways to Keep Your Hearing Aids in Their Best Shape

Does hearing technology call for ongoing professional upkeep? Can I handle any needed maintenance at home? How can I tell whether my devices are damaged? Where can I take them for replacement or repair?

Much like today’s tablets and cellphones, hearing aids are powered by complex technology that may require professional attention in certain circumstances, but a little DIY maintenance can go a long way in keeping your devices in top shape.

Self-care of your hearing aids is an important part of keeping them performing their best, and periodic clean and checks with our caring professionals help identify and address any damage or other problems that might otherwise be harder to spot. Read on for six simple tips to maximize your tech’s longevity.

    1. Keep ‘Em Dry and Sanitized
      Water is kryptonite to hearing aids, so remember to remove them before showering or swimming, and use a hearing aid dryer or dehumidifier not only to reduce moisture but to sanitize your technology at the same time.

 

    1. Wipe Off the Wax
      Earwax (also called “cerumen”) naturally accumulates in the ear and on your hearing aid, but gently wiping your devices each night with a soft, dry cloth and clearing any crevices with the provided brush will make quick work of the buildup.

 

    1. Avoid Extreme Temperatures
      It’s no surprise that storing your devices in excess heat — leaving them in a hot car, for example — can cause damage, but did you know that cold and wind can be a problem, too? Protect your hearing aids from spring chills by wearing a hat, scarf, or earmuffs.

 

    1. Check the Batteries
      Batteries typically can last from a few days to a couple of weeks depending on the technology, usage, and other factors, but a constantly beeping hearing aid may mean the batteries need changing. Always keep spares on hand — or consider rechargeable hearing aids — and remember to remove and store batteries at room temperature apart from your devices when not wearing them.

 

    1. Replace the Wax Guard
      If your technology isn’t functioning properly even with fresh batteries, it may be time to change the wax guard — which helps protect against the damaging accumulation of wax, skin particles, and debris. Put your hearing aid’s wax guard on a monthly change schedule.

 

  1. Skip the Pockets
    Pockets seem naturally convenient for carrying loose hearing aids and batteries while on the go, but not so fast! Keep your devices in their case to avoid losing or getting debris on them, and place batteries where they won’t come into contact with keys, coins, and other metals, which can cause battery discharge and other problems.

If you have questions about hearing aid maintenance, please let us know. And don’t forget to schedule your devices for a professional clean and check at least once every six months. We’re here to help!

How High Humidity Can Affect Hearing Aids and What You Can Do About It

Humidity means moisture, which can effect your hearing aids. Find out the signs of moisture damage and steps you can take to prevent it from happening.

One of the great things about starting your better-hearing journey is that your world is more enjoyable when you can hear all those sounds you’ve been missing.

That might also mean you’re getting outside more, possibly exposing your hearing devices to humidity. Your hearing aids are tiny computers, and just like with laptops and tablets, moisture can present a challenge.

Humidity

Let’s discuss humidity first. Simply put, humidity is a measurement of the amount of water vapor in the air.

Hot air can hold a lot of water vapor, but cold air cannot. When hot air meets cold air, the drop in temperature means a drop in how much water vapor the air can hold.

Let’s consider a can of soda pop: When humid air makes contact with a cold can of soda pop, the air temperature around the can drops quickly. Any water vapor from the humid air that can’t fit in the cold air around the pop can has to go somewhere. That’s when condensation happens, creating the water droplets on the side of the can.

Humidity and Hearing Devices

The why

Humidity affects hearing aids in a couple of ways.

First, just like with condensation on that can of soda pop, moisture results when warm, humid air meets the cooler metal components of your hearing devices. This includes the components inside your devices.

Second, humidity makes you sweat — but humidity also makes it harder for the sweat to evaporate. Plenty of that ends up in or on your devices.

The how

How does all this condensation and perspiration cause trouble?

Moisture clogs ports and openings. It also builds up in tubing, which can affect the frequency response of your hearing technology. It can also corrode components and battery contact points or short-circuit the microphones and receivers.

In short, moisture is like kryptonite to your hearing aids. A little exposure won’t matter all that much, but prolonged exposure will do a lot of damage and affect the performance of your devices.

The what

Common signs of moisture damage include:

  • Sound is full of static or crackling
  • Sound is distorted
  • Sound cuts out during loud noises
  • Sound fades in and out
  • Device works intermittently
The fix

If you suspect you have moisture damage, do a general check first to make sure it’s not something easily solvable. Is the device turned on? Are the batteries in correctly or near the end of their life? Do the battery contacts need to be cleaned or dried? Is the tubing intact? How are the filters and ports?

If all else checks out, it could be a moisture problem. If you have in-the-ear technology, get them in your drying device ASAP, with the battery door open.

If you have behind-the-ear technology, check the earmold tubing for moisture. If at all possible, use an earmold puffer to remove the moisture. Then put your technology in your drying device ASAP, with the battery door open.

In either case, leave the devices in the dryer for a few hours, even if they look dry.

Prevention

Common, effective preventive measures include:

  • Choosing devices with nanocoating or a high IP (water resistance) rating
  • Hearing aid sweatbands that allow sound through but keep moisture out
  • Exercising during the cooler parts of the day
  • Removing your technology when exercising
  • Keeping your technology in a drying device when not in use

Contact us via email or call us now at (918) 532-6539 for a complimentary clean and check of your hearing technology.