The Importance of Dedicated Hearing Care

The real differences between audiology and over-the-counter solutions

In July, President Biden signed an executive order allowing hearing aids to be sold over the counter. This measure is aimed at lowering the cost of hearing care, and at a glance, it seems like a great way to ensure that everyone who needs hearing care is covered. But can OTC products ever compete with the knowledge and expertise of a specialist? Because you deserve the best hearing care available, here are six reasons to make an appointment with an audiologist.

 

1. Expertise

Both audiologists and hearing aid specialists are licensed to sell hearing aids, but audiologists possess master’s or doctorate degrees that concentrate on hearing health. Because individuals develop hearing loss in a variety of ways and have unique communication needs, accurately diagnosing hearing loss and selecting the right hearing aids will ensure successful treatment.

 

2. Fit

To maximize comfort and functionality, hearing aids must be custom fitted to each individual and programmed to support their listening lifestyle. Only a trained audiologist or hearing aid specialist can do this. Additionally, audiologists can monitor your progress over time and make adjustments when necessary. Wearing hearing technology is not a “once and done” solution; it takes time for the body and mind to adjust, and there may be a period of discomfort that requires professional support.

 

3. Patient-Provider Relationship

Hearing loss is a complex condition. It has many different causes, from simple age-related decline to disorders such as Ménière’s disease to exposure to ototoxic chemicals. There are also many comorbidities associated with hearing loss. An audiologist can diagnose and treat many of these, forming a long-lasting relationship with you that goes beyond simply fitting you with hearing aids.

 

4. Tinnitus and Balance Support

Hearing loss often occurs alongside tinnitus, which is a persistent ringing, buzzing, or clicking sound in the ear. While the condition is still being researched and is not yet fully understood, what we know about tinnitus so far falls under the expertise of audiologists. And because the inner ear governs the body’s equilibrium, balance issues are often diagnosed and treated by audiologists as well. Providing support for these conditions is part of our commitment to our patients’ total hearing health.

 

5. Safety

Aside from achieving a better fit and receiving professional support from an audiologist, there is evidence that programming your own hearing technology or choosing a one-size-fits-all solution can actually be harmful. An audiologist will perform a series of tests to assess your hearing loss and ensure your hearing aids meet your needs without being too loud. Hearing technology that amplifies sound too much can further damage your hearing, and an ill-fitting hearing aid can create uncomfortable wax buildup, which may lead to ear infections.

 

6. Investment

While purchasing an OTC hearing aid may provide considerable savings on upfront costs, seeking treatment through a licensed audiologist is a better investment. From warranty protection to professional cleanings and advice on upgrades, nothing compares to our guarantee of quality. We also know hearing aids can be expensive, so we always do our best to provide affordable solutions, including coupons, specials, and financing options. Once you’ve purchased your hearing aids, your treatment plan is put into effect – we will be with you every step of the way in your journey to better hearing and better health.

 

Whether you are a longtime user of hearing aids or considering them for the first time, there is no better decision you can make for your hearing health than choosing an AudigyCertified™ practice to provide you with an expert evaluation. It’s the right choice for you to be sure that you’re pursuing the very best solution for your hearing loss.

6 Inspirational Latinos and Hispanics With Hearing Loss

Hearing Loss Affects More Than Your Ears

Did you know there’s a high prevalence of hearing loss in the Hispanic and Latino population in the U.S.? Untreated hearing loss is linked to decreased cognitive function in this same population, so breaking down barriers to seeking treatment is crucial. And a good place to start is inspiring stories.

To mark National Hispanic Heritage Month in the U.S., which begins in September, and Latin American Heritage Month in Canada, which is in October, let’s look at some important Hispanics and Latinos with hearing loss.

Alex Lacamoire

Musical director of Hamilton, In the Heights, and Wicked

This Cuban American musical natural began studying classical piano at the age of 4 — around the same time his family started speculating that he had hearing loss. At age 13, he performed at the largest concert hall in Mérida, at the Autonomous University of Yucatán in Mexico. By the time he was in high school, he had hearing aids but wouldn’t wear them (he eventually came around). The Berklee College of Music graduate would go on to earn Kennedy Center Honors and win multiple Tonys, several Grammys, and other notable awards.Francisco Goya

Influential painter and printmaker

Goya is considered the most influential Spanish artist of the late 1700s and early 1800s. His body of work reflects the shift to a more modern approach in art. In fact, he paved the way for the likes of Édouard Manet and Pablo Picasso. It was in 1792 or 1793, during his time as a court painter in the royal household, that he suffered an undiagnosed illness that left him permanently deaf. Within a few years, he would assume the title of first court painter under King Charles IV in 1799.

Luis Miguel

Wildly popular singer and performer

Luis Miguel, a Puerto Rican-born Mexican singer who is often called El Sol de México, is widely considered the most successful musical artist in Latin American history. He’s the only Latin-music singer of his generation who did not become a crossover sensation for English-speaking audiences in the 1990s. Decades of performing took its toll, and he now experiences tinnitus, a condition in which a ringing, buzzing, pulsing, or other noise is heard with no external source.

Natália Martins

Professional volleyball player

Brazilian Natália Martins was only 6 years old when she was first fitted with hearing aids to correct her 70% hearing loss. Now, 30 years later, she is Brazil’s first-ever volleyball player with hearing loss to play professionally or to make it on her country’s national team. She played on several leading Brazilian teams before recently deciding to join a premier league in Romania. She is a brand ambassador for Sonova, which in 2020 released a short film about her life.

Stephanie Nogueras

Actor, mentor, and consultant

This Puerto Rican American actor was born profoundly deaf. Right after graduating from the Rochester Institute of Technology, she headed to Hollywood and, within six months, had landed a recurring role as Natalie Pierce on the TV show Switched at Birth and a role on one episode of Grimm. Since then, acting has kept her busy. She also teaches American Sign Language (ASL), mentors families of deaf children in Los Angeles County, and serves as a consultant and ASL coach for TV and film.

Dr. Robert Davila

Former Gallaudet University president (2007–2009)

As a young boy, Robert Davila, who was born in California to Mexican-American parents, had a sporadic education, as his family moved with the seasons. When he was 8, however, a severe case of spinal meningitis left him deaf, and he was sent north to the California School for the Deaf (CSD), where he thrived. He learned both English and ASL, graduated with honors, and went on to earn bachelor’s, master’s, and doctorate degrees. He became president of Gallaudet University, a premier university for the deaf and hard of hearing, after a lifetime of education in both teaching and administration.

Feeling inspired to take that first step to better hearing? Contact us today!

6 Ways to Keep Your Hearing Loss From Getting Worse

6 Ways to Keep Your Hearing Loss From Getting Worse

6 Ways to Keep Your Hearing Loss From Getting Worse

Looking Out for Your Hearing Health Is Even Easier Than You Think

If you have hearing loss, you’re not alone. With an estimated 466 million children and adults living with disabling hearing loss, per the World Health Organization, it’s one of the most common chronic physical conditions around the globe.

Though most types of hearing loss cannot be reversed, they can often be successfully managed with today’s innovative technology. And there are empowering ways you can keep your hearing loss from getting worse. Read on for six tips to do just that.

  • Avoid Noisy Environments

Among the most preventable causes of hearing loss, harmful noise levels — especially those reaching 85 decibels or higher — can do a number on your ears. The damage could be temporary or permanent. And it can worsen with greater noise exposure. When possible, avoiding harmful noise levels altogether is the best bet.

  • Wear Hearing Protection

Of course, avoiding excess noise isn’t always practical — especially if it’s part of your occupation. Whether you’re working around jet engines, calling games amid the whistles and cheers of a packed arena, or operating machinery at a farm, workplaces can be loud. That’s where hearing protection comes in. We recommend custom protection for even more effectiveness and a secure fit.

  • Address Earwax Buildup

Excess cerumen, or earwax buildup, can also be the culprit in worsening hearing loss. Typically your ears naturally push out excess wax, but sometimes the accumulation can form a blockage. To remove an earwax plug, gently soften it with drops of warmed olive oil, almond oil water, or a commercial solution — as long as you don’t have an eardrum perforation.

  • Beware of Ototoxicity

Some medications, including certain drugs used to fight cancer, can be ototoxic, or damaging to the inner ear, potentially leading to hearing loss or worsening of existing hearing difficulties. Rather than stopping the medication if prescribed, talk to your doctor or another provider about the risks, potential alternatives, and possible ways to mitigate any threats to your hearing.

  • Think Total Wellness

It’s easy to think of hearing loss as just an isolated challenge, but it can go hand in hand with other conditions, such as heart disease, kidney disease, diabetes, dementia, and other health problems. Though cause and effect aren’t necessarily conclusive in all cases of hearing loss, staying dedicated to total wellness can potentially go a long way toward helping preserve your current hearing levels.

  • Lean Into Technology

As mentioned early in this story, today’s exciting, advanced technology plays a big role in successfully managing hearing loss. With the help of a licensed hearing care professional and solutions tailored to your needs, you can discover a whole new world of sound. Using hearing technology also helps you preserve the hearing you have.

So don’t wait. Take steps to preserve your hearing today. If it’s been a while since your last hearing check, or your current hearing devices don’t seem to help as much as they used to, contact us for an evaluation. We’re committed to helping you hear your best!

Golfers: 5 Reasons to Keep Your Hearing Health in Shape

Golfers: 5 Reasons to Keep Your Hearing Health in Shape

Why Would a Hearing Care Provider Be Writing About Golf?

If you play golf, you already know one swing of the club is a complex matter. A half-inch difference in heel placement could mean a solid shot or a ball taking a swim.

But one thing golfers depend on, even more than they realize, is their hearing. Here are five ways hearing health supports your golf game.

The Sound of the Clubhead Meeting the Ball

Anyone who has played long enough knows the sweet spot. It’s the sound of your clubhead hitting the ball just right. Distance and accuracy are all but guaranteed with that sweet-spot combination of tone and volume.

Sound is just as important, though, for recognizing when — and how — your clubhead hits the ball wrong. It gives you the information you need to adjust the next shot. This is especially important for chipping and putting, where you want finesse over power.

The Sounds of Camaraderie

A big part of the game is the people involved. Strategizing, heckling, and catching up on each other’s lives is half the enjoyment — and a big reason why many of us pick up the game in the first place.

But it doesn’t stop there. You also hear the heckles, encouragement, and laughter on the other fairways and greens. You might even get to know the people in the group in front of you — or behind you — if it’s a busy day on the links.

The Sound of Danger

Danger? On a golf course? Yes! And you need to be able to hear dangers in advance.

There are surprising dangers — like rattlesnakes and bear cubs — as well as more common ones. Even the best golfers can flub a shot, sending it sailing into another fairway or tee box. And errant, speeding golf carts abound, especially when playing a scramble and when the best shot is “just over this hill, I know it!”

“Golfers, beware,” indeed!

Sure Footing

Sometimes, hearing loss can indeed affect your balance. Every aspect of your game depends on good balance, though, from setup to follow-through. The results of mixing poor balance and golf can range from minor — a missed shot — to major, such as a thrown club, a golf cart accident, or a fall.

Keeping Your Head in the Game

Golf takes brainpower. Strategy and focus are key to a good round. Hearing loss, though, has been linked to cognitive decline. Thinking, remembering, and even your ability to keep your head in the game can suffer. In fact, in one study, seniors with hearing loss experienced cognitive issues 30% to 40% faster than their peers without hearing loss. Hearing aid use, however, may slow cognitive decline by as much as 75%.

A Note in Conclusion

Even way back in 2009, the growing popularity of thin-faced titanium drivers was cause for concern. One study compared the sound of a King Cobra club meeting the ball to a gun blast or sonic boom! If you enjoy using clubs such as the King Cobra — or if you’ve simply noticed that your club packs quite a sonic wallop — consider using hearing protection. There are many kinds available, and some, such as earplugs for musicians, allow you to enjoy conversations and ambient sounds around you but block levels that could damage your hearing.

Contact us today if you think you’d benefit from a hearing evaluation or hearing protection!

8 Back-to-School Communication Tips

Make Hitting the Books Even Easier With These Helpful Tricks

It’s practically back-to-school time! Whether the students in your life are heading back to class in person or online, keep these helpful tips in mind.

  1. Maximize lipreading. Hearing and lipreading work together to enhance communication, making clear masks an important tool for teachers if using protective equipment for in-person learning. It also helps for speakers to appear on camera during virtual classes so that participants can see their lips.
  2. Turn on live captioning during virtual lessons, or ask the host — if applicable — to activate the option. Free apps and web-based services are also available for live transcribing of speech.
  3. Curb background noise. Learning from home can be challenging amid the everyday sounds of household life, but setting up in a quieter room, wearing connected headphones, and closing the door to shut out distracting background noise can help facilitate speech understanding.
  4. Use the chat function — if available when using an online virtual platform — to help clarify any missed points. And remember: There’s a good chance others may need clarification, too, and will appreciate the request.
  5. Pair a compatible wireless multimicrophone with your hearing device to enhance hearing in one-on-one and group environments.
  6. Stream audio directly to your hearing technology. Modern hearing aids can receive audio directly from sources such as smartphones, computers, stereos, and more — depending on compatibility — and make it easy to personalize sound for specific listening and learning needs.
  7. Help your hearing aids and mask coexist. If wearing hearing aids, help keep them undisturbed and working their best by choosing masks that wrap around the head rather than the ears.
  8. Choose the mask setting on your hearing aids — if the option is available — to help clearly and confidently communicate with others who are wearing face coverings.

 

How’s Their Hearing?

Schedule regular hearing checkups for the schoolkids in your household — just as you would for their eyes and teeth — and recognize some of the signs of potential hearing loss:

  • Struggling to understand people speaking through masks
  • Trouble following lessons or instructions from teachers
  • Frequent responses of “Huh?” or “What?”
  • Complaints of noise or earaches
  • Turning up the television volume
  • Failing grades or reports that your child doesn’t respond in class
  • A gut feeling that something’s off with your child’s hearing

Improved hearing can play a big role in helping students perform their best in class. So don’t wait. Schedule back-to-school hearing evaluations for the whole family today!

Summer Noise: 4 Ways Your Hearing Aids Can Help

Turn Up Summer Fun With Hearing Aids

People don’t often think “Fun!” when they think of hearing aids. But today’s hearing aids are designed to meet your needs no matter what’s going on. Let’s check out a few ways your hearing aids can actually enhance your fun this summer.

Enjoy Group Conversations Outdoors

Most hearing aids today have a set of built-in capabilities ideal for highlighting speech in conversations. Directional microphones are designed to focus on whatever you’re facing. This is because you usually speak to someone in front of you. Some models of directional microphones do switch positions based on speech and sound cues.

Today’s hearing aids also do a very good job filtering out background noise. You can devote your energy to your conversation, not on cutting through clatter. It’s also becoming more and more feasible to use your smartphone as a microphone. For example: You place your smartphone on the picnic table, it picks up what everyone is saying, and it streams the audio to your hearing devices. It’s almost like you’re wearing conversation-enhancing headphones!

Muzzle Fireworks

Many of today’s digital hearing aids have a function called transient-noise suppression, impulse-noise reduction, or something similar. It’s a fancy way of saying that the hearing aid will lower the volume of sudden, brief noises — like dishes being dropped. You can still enjoy fireworks, but at a safe listening level. Check your hearing aid’s instructions, or check with your provider to find out if you have this functionality.

Change Settings Automatically

Many hearing aids now use a smartphone app. From controlling the volume to nudging the settings on your hearing aids, you can do a lot by utilizing these apps. One exciting capability is geotagging, or assigning a geographical “bookmark” to your favorite spots. Simply optimize your hearing aids for a location (for example, a park, baseball diamond, or your favorite restaurant), and apply a geotag. When you return to that spot, your settings will switch automatically!

Banish Wind Noise

Hearing aid microphones are placed just outside your ear canal or behind your ear. This means they may pick up a lot of wind noise. But ReSound has developed a breakthrough with the ReSound ONE device, which allows an extra microphone to be placed inside your ear canal, where the wind can’t reach it.

Contact us today to learn more about the built-in ways your hearing aids can boost your summer fun!

Q&A: Upgrading Your Hearing Aids

Q: How often should I update my hearing devices?

A: That’s a good question we’ve addressed with many patients and their loved ones. The short answer is that a hearing device should typically be replaced about every three to six years or so.

Really, however, the answer is a bit more involved. Several factors may figure into whether it’s time to update your hearing instruments. They include:

  • Level and sophistication of the hearing technology
  • Quality of upkeep and maintenance throughout use
  • Potential changes in your hearing ability or listening lifestyle
  • Condition and performance of your existing hearing devices

Here are five potential signs you need fresh hearing technology:

Device Malfunctioning

You do all the recommended maintenance, but things still aren’t right: Replaced batteries drain quickly; sound is still muffled after you change wax guards. The occasional repair is one thing, but regular malfunctions mean it’s time to replace your devices.

Hearing Level Has Changed

Your hearing changes over time because of age, loud sounds, or other health issues. Often we can adjust your programming to meet your new needs, but sometimes your hearing changes so much that you require a different level of technology.

Often we can adjust your programming to meet your new needs, but sometimes your hearing changes so much that you require a different level of technology.

Repairs Seem Costly

With older devices, the parts are often scarce or the model is discontinued. Sometimes repairing your devices costs enough that it makes more sense to replace them with new hearing aids.

Technology Evolving

Devices have advanced significantly — with better filtering of background noise, rechargeability without the hassle of disposable batteries, tinnitus management, wireless streaming from smartphones and other audio sources, and even fall detection and built-in translation capabilities, depending on the device.

New Interests or Environments   

When your lifestyle changes, your tech might need to also. Took up a sport? You’ll probably need moisture resistance. Switched from an office job to a gig outdoors? You’ll likely experience a different  noise level now.

Hearing your best is more critical than ever in our changing world — with in-person and virtual communication both playing important roles in today’s new normal. If you think it might be time to update your hearing devices, please don’t wait. Contact us today to get your questions answered or to schedule a consultation and tech demo. We’re ‘HEAR’ to help!

Home Safety for People With Hearing Loss | Safety Alert Devices

So many things around the house are designed to alert you using noise. But what if a hearing loss means you miss when the smoke detector or alarm clock sounds?

The following alerting devices are ideal methods for helping your home — or the home of a loved one — feel even safer.


Smoke Alarms

A smoke alarm-based alert uses a bright, blinking light to indicate the smoke alarm is going off. You can buy an adapter for your existing smoke alarm, or you can buy a whole new battery-powered or hardwired smoke alarm with an alert built right in. When paired with a central alert system, you can also include a vibrating shaker to put under your pillow.

Doorbells

A doorbell alert sends a signal to a receiver that flashes a light, increases the volume of the doorbell, activates a shaker under your pillow or couch cushion, or all three. Often, you can buy extra receivers as well, so you could have one in your living room, bedroom, and kitchen. Some work up to 20 feet, others up to 1,000 feet. They are available in either battery operated or hardwired to your electrical system.

Weather Alerts

The NOAA All Hazards Weather Radio offers a simple text readout and visual or vibrating alarm features. Third-party vendors offer adapters that color code the warning lights and make the display more readable.

Baby Monitors

These are available in everything from simple to complex. The simplest style has an audio monitor for baby’s room that triggers a vibrating shaker under your pillow. You can also find systems, however, that use multiple monitors, video, lights, and sound. You can even turn your smartphone into a video monitor that triggers an under-pillow vibrating shaker.

Alarm Clocks

There are alarm clocks tailored to those with hearing loss, and there are accessories you can use with your existing alarm clock as well. Just like the doorbell alerts, alarm clock alerts increase the alarm volume, use a shaker placed under your pillow, use flashing lights, or all three. Still others have outlets — plug in any bedside lamp, and it turns on and off as the alarm sounds.

Do you use your cellphone or smartphone as an alarm clock? There are shakers you can place under your pillow that are triggered by a smartphone app when your phone alarm goes off.

Landline Phones

You can get traditional phones tailored to those with hearing loss or purchase accessories to use with your existing phone. A louder ring, flashing lights, a vibrating shaker under the pillow, or all three are available. There are even phones with outlets — much like the alarm clock option above, plug in any available lamp, and it turns on and off as the phone rings.


Contact us to learn more about home safety or to schedule a hearing evaluation!

Illustration of a silhouette of a human head with a brain - represented by a rain cloud - inside

Could Healthy Hearing Help People With Movement Disorders?

Your ears and your brain are fast friends. In fact, it seems like a new connection is reported every few months. There’s even a growing body of research showing that untreated hearing loss is linked to dementia.

That’s why we encourage annual hearing checkups. Catching changes in hearing early keeps a host of other issues at bay. And we’re just scratching the surface of what we know about the ear-brain connection.

Your ears and brain are so well connected, in fact, that one recent study in Scientific Reports is based on a link the researchers discovered on accident. It’s a link that could improve the assistive devices used by people with movement disorders or limb loss.

Brain-Computer Interfaces

A research team called BrainGate develops brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). These are implants that use nerve signals in the brain to manipulate assistive devices such as prosthetic limbs. Most BCI implants are put in a part of the brain that controls planning to act called the motor cortex. The BrainGate team wondered how workable it was to gather nerve signals earlier than that, though.

Could they use nerve signals from an area of the brain responsible for the simple urge to act — before the planning-to-act brain region gets involved? If so, they might be able to speed up BCI response times.

An Accidental Discovery

One clinical trial participant, because of a spinal cord injury, no longer had the use of his arms and legs. During a simple movement exercise that involved visual cues, his brain was monitored by fMRI. It showed activity in a certain area of this urge-to-act region of his brain.

They repeated the experiment with the BCI implant, instead of fMRI. To their surprise, the implant didn’t register activity in that same area. But while reviewing data from a related research session, they found something equally surprising. During the movement exercise, when they used verbal — not visual — cues, the implant picked up strong signals from that same urge-to-act area.

A Study With Only One Participant

To the BrainGate team, it seemed like this urge-to-act area didn’t care at all about visual cues, only sound-based cues. They designed a new study using the BCI implant to test their hypothesis. It had a sample size of only one — that same spinal-cord-injury participant mentioned above — and the research alternated between visual-only and sound-based-only cues.
They found that the urge-to-act area responded to sound-based cues but not to visual cues. They also found that the planning-to-act area responded to both, and had no preference either way.
The results were published in Scientific Reports in the article “Auditory cues reveal intended movement information in middle frontal gyrus neuronal ensemble activity of a person with tetraplegia.”

Why It Matters

The BrainGate team has some successes under their belt. People with spinal cord injury, brainstem stroke, and ALS have managed to control a computer cursor simply by thinking about the corresponding limb movement. In clinical research, they’ve managed intuitive control over advanced prosthetic limbs. Plus, people with paralysis have enjoyed easy control over powerful external devices.

By discovering that this urge-to-act area responds to sound cues, they can use it as a complement to the planning-to-act area, and BCI implants can gather movement data from two different regions of the brain. The researchers hope to one day use BCIs to enable reliable, intuitive, naturally controlled movement of paralyzed limbs.

And healthy hearing could be an important piece of this exciting puzzle.

Illustration of multiple stacks of books, some open, on a light yellow background

The Best Hearing Summer Reading/Watch/Listen List You Need

No summer’s complete without a good reading list, so we’re hooking you up.

From books to films to podcasts, we’ve put together some inspiring, entertaining, or though-provoking options that have some connection to hearing loss or sound. Take a listen, watch, or read, and let us know what you think!

  • The Way I Hear It: A Life With Hearing Loss (Book)

    Humorist, actress, public speaker, and hearing loss advocate Gael Hannan takes readers on a journey of life lessons and more in this 2015 book. Her insights offer advice and inspiration not only for those with hearing loss but for their loved ones, too.

  • Sound of Metal* (Film)

    Imagine being a musician on tour when suddenly confronted with profound hearing loss. It’s the challenge of a lifetime for heavy-metal drummer Ruben, who’s also in recovery. The deep-diving movie has garnered praise in the Deaf community and generated exciting Oscar 2021 buzz.

  • The Hear Me Out! [CC] Podcast (Podcast)

    Everyone has a story worth hearing, and host Ahmed Khalifa sees to it that you do. Whether talking deaf representation in pop culture, censorship in captions, or success at audiology appointments, Khalifa — a host with firsthand hearing loss experience — offers interviews and more in this candid series.

  • The Walking Dead* (TV series)

    You’ve probably heard of this juggernaut zombie series whose upcoming 11th season will be its last. But did you know recent seasons include two amazing actors — Angel Theory and Lauren Ridloff — who use American Sign Language on the show and have hearing loss in real life? Check it out!

  • Impossible Music (Book)

    This young-adult novel follows two Australian teens navigating deafness after having been able to hear most of their lives. The coming-of-age story about change, identity, belonging, relationships, adaptation, and resilience offers another perspective on life’s twists, turns, and blessings.

  • See What I’m Saying: The Deaf Entertainers Documentary* (Film)

    What’s it like as an entertainer with hearing loss to follow your professional dreams? This award-winning 2009 documentary offers an unflinching up-close look through the ups, downs, adventures, and triumphs of drummer Bob, comic CJ, actor and educator Robert, and singer TL.

  • My Deaf Friend Can Do Anything You Can Do (Book)

    Misconceptions and stereotypes can get in the way of building better understanding. This children’s book offers an opportunity for the whole family to explore the experiences of those with hearing loss and gain greater appreciation for what everyone brings to the table.

  • Twenty Thousand Hertz (Podcast)

    Cool title, right? This podcast is all about sound — as in, what it is, how it works, how beings can hear, and so on. It breaks down interesting topics such as synesthesia — dig into the January 13, 2021, episode to learn more — and serves up backstories on well-known sounds you might recognize.


We hope you enjoy this summer list. You might come up with a few entries of your own, too! And remember, we’re here to help you get the most out of the season by hearing your best. Schedule a hearing evaluation with our caring team today.

*Viewer discretion advised for language or visuals.