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5 Simple Ways to Boost Your Mood This Winter

Hearing health and mental health have a clear connection.

In fact, untreated hearing loss increases your risk of depression, anxiety, social isolation, and more. Winter is also a prime time for seasonal blahs. If you could use a little mental-health boost, here are some simple ways to get started.


Express Gratitude

Gratitude improves happiness, well-being, and mental health. The best-researched method is keeping a gratitude journal. Once or twice a week, choose one act or person you’re grateful for and write a few sentences detailing why. In daily life, you’ll begin to seek out the positive — rather than the negative — and writing it down allows you to really savor that positive emotion.
 

Exercise

Exercise releases endorphins, which relieve stress and boost your mood. You can even use small things that add more activity to your day, like skipping the elevator in favor of the stairs or taking a short, brisk walk. If you work from home, tackle chores that require you to walk to another room or — better yet — another floor. Aim for 30 minutes a day.
 

Spoil Your Senses

Use your senses to quickly find calm. For some people, it’s an uplifting song or the smell of ground coffee. For others, it’s squeezing a stress ball. Each person’s relationship to their senses is a little different, so experiment to figure out what works best to bring you back to center.
 

Lose Yourself

Doing something you love, something you know you can lose yourself in, allows you to forget about life for a while. You don’t have to be a parent, a spouse, or an employee — you can just be.
 

Find a Furry Friend

Interacting with a pet lowers cortisol — the stress hormone — and raises oxytocin — the feel-good hormone. It also lowers blood pressure and eases loneliness and depression. Don’t have a pet? Walk a friend’s dog, volunteer to cat-sit for a vacationing neighbor, or volunteer at a shelter.

Contact us to learn more about the hearing health–mental health connection!

Is Tinnitus Affecting Your Brain’s Emotional Processes?

Anyone afflicted with the annoying ringing and hissing of tinnitus is well aware of the stress, anxiety, and irritability that accompany these phantom noises — but could tinnitus alter an individual’s emotional processing altogether? Research on the subject from the University of Illinois suggests this may be the case.

Using MRI scans to show which areas of the brain respond to various auditory stimuli, researchers found that when compared with normal-hearing people, those with tinnitus showed less activity in the amygdala — a region of the brain associated with emotional processing — but more activity in two other regions associated with emotion.

The findings suggested to researchers that the amygdala in those who suffer from tinnitus had become less active because the brain had adjusted to the tinnitus. In other words, the amygdala couldn’t be active all the time due to the annoying sound, and perhaps other areas of the brain became more active to make up for that reduced activity. This may have translated to an altered emotional state because of the difference in how the brain was processing emotions.

For many, tinnitus relief can be found through a treatment called masking. The technique involves using white noise (either natural or artificial) to cover the sounds of the tinnitus, allowing you to focus more on the sounds of the world around you.

Please call our office at 918.333.9992 to schedule a free clean and check, and we’ll show you how a new hearing system might help you find the relief you seek with a technology demonstration. Put your tinnitus to rest — call to schedule your appointment today!

Sincerely,

Dr. Stephanie R. Moore
Audiologist