January is National Soup Month! Celebrate with 5 healthy-hearing recipes

January Is National Soup Month ó 5 Healthy-Hearing Soup Recipes to Get You in the Spirit

Nutrition is a great way to prevent hearing loss. Read on for great soup recipes that will get your hearing health on sure footing for the coming year.

Itís National Soup Month! What better way to kick it off than with an old Italian proverb?

ìSoup does seven things: It takes away hunger, takes away thirst, fills the stomach, cleans the teeth, makes you sleep, makes you slim, and puts color in your cheeks.î

Not enough reason to ladle out some of the good stuff? Hereís another: Many ingredients that go great in soup are great for hearing health!

Soup Recipes for Maintaining Hearing Health

Savor the taste and the hearing health with these five soups that are rich in folate and omega-3 fatty acids. These nutrients ensure your cochlea ó the part of your inner ear where sound is converted to signals that get sent to your brain ó is nourished with healthy blood flow.

1. Salmon Chowder

Nothing says ìheart of winterî like a steaming bowl of chowder! This easy-to-make recipe calls for both clam juice and salmon, which has more than three times the hearing-healthy omega-3 content of clam. You still get the familiar hint of clam, but you also get to enjoy the nutrition and taste of salmon.

2. Beef and Cabbage Stew

OK, you caught us ó this is a stew, not a soup. But how can you go wrong with beef and cabbage stew? Itís a hearty bowl of warm winter goodness! Plus, this recipe has three strong sources of folate: cabbage, carrots, and celery. Itíll warm your heart and keep your cochlea happy.

3. Four-Bean Chili

Just when you thought there were no new chilis on the horizon, along comes this little four-bean wonder. No matter where you land in the debate about whether chili is a kind of soup, youíll agree this is a little bowl of heaven. We wonít tell you the secret (youíll have to check out the recipe to find out), but this four-bean chili is a folate fountain with its pinto beans, black beans, navy beans, and kidney beans.

4. Easy Fish Stew

Thereís just no stopping the flavor or nutrition in this rich stew. From more traditional fare like celery and carrots to the zesty bouquet garni, youíll be pleasantly surprised at all this Mediterranean fish stew has to offer. And if that isnít enough reason to try it out, itís rich in both folate (celery, carrots, tomatoes) and omega-3 fatty acids (anchovies, white-fleshed fish). Your cochlea wonít know what hit it!

5. Squash Soup

Donít let the uninspiring name fool you. This butternut squash soup is unassuming but mighty! The ginger, nutmeg, and honey provide just the right balance to the hearty squash foundation. Plus, squash is a good source of folate ó hearing health never tasted so delicious!

Did you know? Exercise can also help prevent hearing impairment

Making Moves for Hearing Health

Search Top 10 New Years resolutionsî and what are you sure to find? Lists that often start with ìfitnessî or exercise. With benefits from better skin and stronger bones to weight loss, improved mental health, and more, itís no wonder that exercise pops up as a perennial New Yearís resolution favorite!

But did you know? Exercise can also help prevent hearing impairment.

So if you or your loved ones are kicking off the new year with physical fitness goals in sight, keep in mind these four tips for better hearing health:

1. Exercise May Delay Age-Related Hearing Loss

An estimated one of every three adults between ages 65 and 74 lives with hearing impairment, per the National Institute on Deafness and Communication Disorders, making it a common health challenge among seniors. Research, however, shows that exercise can stave off age-related hearing loss (AHL). One relatively recent study using mice, for example, found that ìregular exercise slowed AHLî and deterioration of the cochlea, the part of the inner ear that detects sound.

2. What Helps Your Heart Helps Your Ears

People with heart disease, a leading cause of death worldwide, are 54 percent more likely to experience hearing loss. Research shows, however, that individuals entering their 50s with good cardiovascular health have better hearing than their counterparts with poor cardiovascular fitness. Just ì30 minutes a day, five times a weekî of moderate or vigorous exercise can help cut the risk of heart disease, per the American Heart Association, and it doesnít have to be hard: ìThe simplest positive change you can make to effectively improve your heart health is to start walking.

3. Brainpower Is Hearing Power

Ears are vital to hearing, but the brain does the heavy lifting ó recognizing sound, using ears to help orient the body, and separating desired sounds from competing noise. Studies show that exercise supports brain health. Wrote Harvard Health Blogís executive editor: ìThe benefits of exercise come directly from its ability to reduce insulin resistance, reduce inflammation, and stimulate the release of growth factors ó chemicals in the brain that affect the health of brain cells, the growth of new blood vessels in the brain, and even the abundance and survival of new brain cells.

4. Less Noise Makes a Big Difference

Whether kickboxing to the latest beats at the gym or hitting the walking trail with your MP3 player, getting the most out of a hearing-healthy workout includes protecting your ears from excess noise ó the most preventable cause of hearing loss. Wear quality earplugs and keep a good distance from speakers in group exercise classes, where music volumes can reach well above the danger threshold of 85 decibels. If using an MP3 player or other personal music device, remember to turn it at least halfway down or lower from full volume.


What are your goals for better hearing and wellness this year? At [practice-name], weíre here to help you achieve them! Contact us to schedule a hearing exam or a clean and check of your hearing aids today

Common Symptoms of Hearing Loss and When to Get a Hearing Test

Give Yourself and Your Health the Best Possible Start in 2018. Know the Signs of Hearing Loss and Get Your Hearing Tested!

Hearing Loss Is More Common Than You Think

About 48 million Americans have some degree of hearing loss. We share the common signs or hearing loss and what to do to get your hearing tested.

When it comes to communication, hearing is our most critical sense. Even a relatively mild hearing loss can seriously disrupt how we interact and connect with others.

Healthy hearing requires a number of processes in the inner ear and brain to work properly and correctly interpret the sounds you hear. Inner-ear problems, or ear problems in general, can prevent crucial sound information from reaching the brain, leading to confusion and an inability to hear and understand speech.

Quick Hearing Loss Statistics

  • About 48 million Americans have some degree of hearing loss
  • Hearing loss is more common in those with a history of smoking, binge drinking, and circulatory disorders such as high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes
  • Hearing loss is 5.5 times more common in men than women
  • Approximately 50% of Baby Boomers (individuals aged 45 to 64) have a hearing loss

 

How Do I Know If I Have a Hearing Loss?

The most common type of hearing loss is noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), which is caused by continual exposure to noise levels greater than 85 dB. NIHL usually occurs slowly over time, and you might not know that you have a hearing loss until it’s been established for several years. Even then, you may assume it’s only a temporary problem, but most of the time, NIHL is permanent.

In the early stages of hearing impairment, the highest frequencies are usually the first to go. Symptoms include difficulty hearing or understanding high-pitched voices, and understanding speech in background noise. People with hearing loss often have difficulty differentiating between words that sound alike, and in particular words that contain S, F, SH, CH, H, TH, T, K, or soft C sounds. These consonants are in a much higher frequency range than vowels and other consonants.

You should contact an audiologist or hearing care provider if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms:

  • Asking people to repeat themselves often
  • Difficulty following conversations that involve more than two people
  • Thinking that others are mumbling or speaking quietly
  • Difficulty hearing speech in noisy situations
  • Stress from straining to hear what others are saying
  • Withdrawing from normally enjoyable social situations more often

If you suspect you or a loved one is experiencing any of the above symptoms, let us help! [Contact our practice today] to schedule a hearing evaluation.

Rheumatoid Arthritis’ Connection to Hearing Loss

What does rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have to do with hearing loss? Quite a bit, according to a new study released by the Open Rheumatology Journal.

Hearing loss has been linked to a decrease in overall mental and physical health. Research has proven connections with age, smoking, cognitive decline, heart health, and a diminished quality of life — and now rheumatoid arthritis.

This is the first study of hearing impairment in RA. The study’s conclusion: Those with rheumatoid arthritis are at a higher risk of hearing impairment over the course of the disease. In addition, the study suggests it’s obvious that hearing impairment in RA is a multi-factorial disease because environmental factors like smoking, disease characteristics like rheumatoid nodules, and patient characteristics like age can affect it. However, it’s still unclear if these factors affect one another both directly and indirectly.

One environmental factor found in this study to increase chances of both RA and hearing loss was smoking. Researchers stated, “there is a strong correlation between smoking and rheumatoid nodules in RA.” They recognized that passive smokers as well as active smokers are at a higher risk of hearing impairment.

Though more investigation is needed to determine a consensus regarding the management of hearing impairment in patients with RA, researchers stated, “… regular audiometric test and [otoacoustic emission test] is advisable and can diagnose hearing loss at an early stage.”

An estimated 48 million Americans — about one in five people — have some form of hearing loss, according to a Johns Hopkins study. It’s a chronic public-health challenge that, if left untreated, can have far-reaching consequences for physical, mental, social, and even financial health.

Hearing loss especially affects older adults, many of whom don’t seek hearing help. Only 30 percent of adults ages 70 or older who could benefit from hearing aids use them, according to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.

If you believe you or a loved one could benefit from a hearing test, contact us today to schedule a hearing screening. We can help get you on a path to better hearing and better health.

‘Hearable’ Holiday Gift Guide

Tech tailored to you, your lifestyle, and your goals

Looking to get yourself or your favorite tech-savvy, fitness-focused loved one a pair of hearables this season? Check out our helpful hearable gift guide that covers what they are, some of the different features, various brands, and the ordering process.

What ‘Hearables’ Are

The definition of a “hearable” is constantly evolving, like the technology. To attempt to encompass all the variations of this technology, a hearable is a wireless in-ear computational device. This mini-computer uses wireless/Bluetooth® technology to complement and enhance your sound experience. Fitness tracking is another key feature that sets these apart from wireless headphones.

These devices are transforming according to wearers’ ever-changing wants:

    • The ability to sync with wireless devices to stay connected to people, hobbies, and music
    • The technology to measure biometrics (like heart rate, calories burned, etc.)
    • Quality sound streaming

What to Look for in a Hearable

These little guys can do so much, so how do you know which one is for you? Check out some of these highlighted features:
HEARABLEIMAGE
Resound-owned Jabra’s Elite Sport wireless earbuds (like Bragi’s The Dash Pro) feature nearly every benefit we’ve highlighted in our table, from audio transparency (so you can be more aware of your surroundings while still enjoying your tech) to high-quality sound and calls.

wireless arbud guide
Wireless earbud guide (click to enlarge)

Timeline for Fitting

Some hearables are customizable, such as the Bragi family of technology. In this case, the wearer would need an earmold impression created by a dispenser or audiologist (like us!). Any hearables that can be customized follow the same process. Contact our office about our policy.

The process for creating an earmold impression begins with the consumer getting an otoscopic evaluation from a professional to ensure an earmold impression can be taken. The actual earmold impression is created by inserting a block into the ear canal along with the earmold impression material. This cures for about 10 minutes, and then the earmold impression material — now a mold of the ear — is sent to the hearable manufacturer for customization.

Have questions? Would you like to get an earmold made? Give the gift of hearables this season with our help!

Sources:
everydayhearing.com

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Title: Holiday Gift Ideas for Better Hearing Technology 2017

Meta: Get the latest information on hearable technologies for your tech-savvy and fitness focused loved ones this holiday season.

Slug: hearable-holiday-gift-guide

Categories: Hearing Accessories, Holidays, Tips & Tricks

Alt Text: Latest hearing technology for the holidays

CLANG! SLAM! RIZZZ! VROOM!

From engines running and car doors closing to sanders whirring and air compressors humming, workplace noise comes with the territory at auto shops, and some of it can prove damaging to a mechanic’s ears and hearing health. An estimated 22 million American workers across various industries experience dangerous sound levels, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), yet excess noise is one of the most preventable causes of hearing loss.

Did you know?

  • Four million Americans work amid hazardous noise levels every day.
  • Occupational noise is a key culprit in hearing loss that occurs in adulthood.
  • Workers’ compensation for hearing loss disability amounts to about $242 million each year.
  • Some 34% of those exposed to workplace noise report that they skip hearing protection.
  • More than 31 million Americans ages 6 to 69 have permanent hearing damage due to noise.
  • Loud noise can destroy the inner ear’s hair cells, a crucial, irreplaceable part of healthy hearing.
  • Quality hearing protection reduces noise intensity while still allowing the sounds you want to hear.
  • Exposure to excess noise can lead to tinnitus, a common and potentially debilitating problem of buzzing, humming, or ringing in one or both ears.
  • Hearing loss due to noise exposure is cumulative and could go unnoticed until years later, but the damage may continue to occur and be irreversible.

In honor of National Protect Your Hearing Month in October, read on to learn more about the risks associated with working in an auto shop and ways to guard against noise hazards in any workplace.

How Loud Is Too Loud in an Auto Shop? Hint: Safer Levels Are Below 85 Decibels.

Some Typical Noise Hazards Decibel Level or “dBA”
Running engine 190
Air hammer on metal 112
Compressed air through nozzle 95
Disk sander 90
Car horn 110
Electric drill 102
Loaded impact wrench 102
Angle grinders Over 85
Industrial vacuum 85

 Recommended Standard According to NIOSH, workplace noise exposure “should be controlled below a level equivalent to 85 dBA for eight hours to minimize occupational noise induced hearing loss.”   Length of Time Before Damage Occurs Noise-related hearing loss can be temporary or permanent, immediate or gradual. It can occur from one-time exposure to a forceful sound, such as an explosion, or result from prolonged exposure to sounds at or louder than 85 decibels. The greater the sound, the faster the damage may occur.\ Both NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) offer guidance for curbing workplace noise hazards. In fact, OSHA requires selected employers to implement a hearing-conservation program “whenever worker noise exposure is equal to or greater than 85 dBA for an 8 hour exposure or in the construction industry when exposures exceed 90 dBA for an 8 hour exposure.”

Some ways to control or protect against occupational noise hazards include:

  • Engineering controls, which involve solutions such as modifying or replacing equipment, substituting less-noisy alternatives, separating the noise source from workers, or conducting noise-reducing maintenance or repairs.
  • Administrative controls, including limiting the duration of exposure to noisy equipment, providing quiet spaces for respite away from noise, and running noisy machines during less-populated shifts.
  • Effective and properly worn hearing protection such as quality earplugs, headphones, and earmuffs designed to suppress noise.

If you have a noise-related hearing loss, you can be helped. Schedule an appointment with your local audiologist, who can conduct a case history, provide a complete diagnostic hearing evaluation, and make the appropriate recommendations — which could include custom hearing protection, treatment with hearing technology, or both — based on your individual results. ——————————– title tag: How to Protect Your Hearing From Noise Hazards on the Job meta description: Noise-related hearing loss is a serious issue and one that is easily preventable. Follow these helpful tips and protect your hearing! slug: protect-hearing-noise-hazards alt text: How to keep your ears safe on the job category: hearing loss, hearing health, hearing protection

Hearing loss and Cochlear Implants

Many patients ask if they have enough hearing loss to qualify for a cochlear implant. That can only be determined by a thorough diagnostic hearing evaluation. If a patient’s hearing loss reaches a severe level (which some insurances have certain required levels of severity of hearing loss), then the patient would need to meet with a surgeon to determine if they are a surgical candidate for implantation. If a patient is implanted, we do follow up implant mapping (programming) at our location.